Americans are stuck in Morocco after flight bans

Gayle Guynup, 68, is one of hundreds of U.S. citizens stuck in Morocco, on a vacation they can’t find a way to end. It’s become an all-too-familiar story with international borders closing as governments respond to the coronavirus pandemic, leaving people stranded. Guynup, of Santa Rosa, Calif., said her vacation deteriorated fast. She checked the news Saturday night to see reports that Morocco was suspending all international flights. By Monday, she was part of a frantic crowd at the airport trying to rebook a seat out to no avail. That same day, Morocco, which hosts around 12 million tourists yearly, ordered hotels, restaurants and entertainment centers to close. The cou

Gayle Guynup, 68, is one of hundreds of U.S. citizens stuck in Morocco, on a vacation they can’t find a way to end.

It’s become an all-too-familiar story with international borders closing as governments respond to the coronavirus pandemic, leaving people stranded.

Guynup, of Santa Rosa, Calif., said her vacation deteriorated fast. She checked the news Saturday night to see reports that Morocco was suspending all international flights. By Monday, she was part of a frantic crowd at the airport trying to rebook a seat out to no avail. That same day, Morocco, which hosts around 12 million tourists yearly, ordered hotels, restaurants and entertainment centers to close. The country has 37 coronavirus cases and one related death.

She said she feels abandoned by her government.

“Egypt, Turkey, France and Great Britain have already taken actions on getting flights for their nationals out,” she told The Washington Post. “And our embassy [in Morocco] has not reached out to any of us.”

On Tuesday, the U.S. Embassy in Rabat’s Twitter account urged U.S. citizens to try to book a seat on one of 50 commercial flights the British Embassy in Morocco was organizing to London until Thursday.

Source: Washigntonpost